Feb 262015
 

Jays Chicago serving Nashville

Jay would like to thank everyone who has been so supportive (and hungry) of his authentic Chicago street-fare. You’ve enabled us to grow our presence in the Nashville area. We can now better meet demand with all the trimmings! So don’t be shy if you see Jay’s Chicago pop up near you. Come on over, say “hey” and try a “meal in a bun” Chicago-style.

Feb 132013
 

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Chicago-style hot dogs are cooked in hot water or steamed before adding the toppings.[1][7] A less common style is cooked on a charcoal grill and referred to as a “chardog.” Chardogs are easily identifiable because very often the ends of the dog are sliced in criss cross fashion before cooking, producing a distinctive “curled-x” shape as the dog cooks. Some hot dog stands, such as the Weiners Circle, only serve char-dogs.[20][21]

The typical beef hot dog weighs 1/8 of a pound or 2 ounces (57 g) and the most traditional type features a natural casing, providing a distinctive “snap” when bitten.[6][22]

The buns are a high-gluten variety made to hold up to steam warming, typically the S. Rosen’s Mary Ann brand from Alpha Baking Company.

As a long time Chicago native, I will provide an authentic Vienna Beef Hotdog on a S. Rosen steamed poppy seed bun, Polish Sausage, Italian Beef Sandwich with a Gonnella Roll, Jay’s Potato Chips and a cold beverage from a mobile Hot Dog cart for the lunch time crowd and private events throughout the Nashville and surrounding counties. Come taste and smell Maxwell Street, Comiskey Park, Wrigley Field or The Chicago Stadium.

Feb 032013
 

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Chicago-style hot dog, or Chicago Dog, is an all-beef frankfurter[1][3] on a poppy seed bun,[4] originating from the city ofChicago, Illinois. The hot dog is topped with yellow mustard; chopped white onions; bright green sweet pickle relish; a dill picklespear; tomato slices or wedges; pickled sport peppers; and a dash of celery salt.[1][5][6][7] The complete assembly of a Chicago hot dog is said to be “dragged through the garden” due to the many toppings.[8][9] The method for cooking the hot dog itself varies depending on the respective vendors preference. Most often they are steamed, water-simmered or grilled over charcoal, the latter of which are referred to as “char-dogs.”

The canonical recipe[1] does not include ketchup, and there is a widely-shared, strong opinion among many Chicagoans and aficionados that ketchup is unacceptable.[10][11][12][13] A number of Chicago hot dog vendors do not offer ketchup as a condiment.[14]

Feb 032013
 

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Chicago-style hot dog, or Chicago Dog, is an all-beef frankfurter[1][3] on a poppy seed bun,[4] originating from the city ofChicago, Illinois. The hot dog is topped with yellow mustard; chopped white onions; bright green sweet pickle relish; a dill picklespear; tomato slices or wedges; pickled sport peppers; and a dash of celery salt.[1][5][6][7] The complete assembly of a Chicago hot dog is said to be “dragged through the garden” due to the many toppings.[8][9] The method for cooking the hot dog itself varies depending on the respective vendors preference. Most often they are steamed, water-simmered or grilled over charcoal, the latter of which are referred to as “char-dogs.”

The canonical recipe[1] does not include ketchup, and there is a widely-shared, strong opinion among many Chicagoans and aficionados that ketchup is unacceptable.[10][11][12][13] A number of Chicago hot dog vendors do not offer ketchup as a condiment.[14]

Jan 032013
 

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The “dragged through the garden” style is heavily promoted by Vienna Beef and Red Hot Chicago, the two most prominent Chicago hot dog manufacturers,[18] but exceptions are common, with vendors adding cucumber slices or lettuce,[1] omitting poppyseeds or celery salt, or using plain relish or a skinless hot dog.[19] Several popular hot dog stands serve a simpler version: a steamed natural-casing dog with only mustard, onions, plain relish and sport peppers, wrapped up with hand-cut french fries,[1] while the historic Superdawg drive-insnotably substitute a pickled tomato for fresh