Feb 262015
 

Jays Chicago serving Nashville

Jay would like to thank everyone who has been so supportive (and hungry) of his authentic Chicago street-fare. You’ve enabled us to grow our presence in the Nashville area. We can now better meet demand with all the trimmings! So don’t be shy if you see Jay’s Chicago pop up near you. Come on over, say “hey” and try a “meal in a bun” Chicago-style.

Feb 032013
 

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Chicago-style hot dog, or Chicago Dog, is an all-beef frankfurter[1][3] on a poppy seed bun,[4] originating from the city ofChicago, Illinois. The hot dog is topped with yellow mustard; chopped white onions; bright green sweet pickle relish; a dill picklespear; tomato slices or wedges; pickled sport peppers; and a dash of celery salt.[1][5][6][7] The complete assembly of a Chicago hot dog is said to be “dragged through the garden” due to the many toppings.[8][9] The method for cooking the hot dog itself varies depending on the respective vendors preference. Most often they are steamed, water-simmered or grilled over charcoal, the latter of which are referred to as “char-dogs.”

The canonical recipe[1] does not include ketchup, and there is a widely-shared, strong opinion among many Chicagoans and aficionados that ketchup is unacceptable.[10][11][12][13] A number of Chicago hot dog vendors do not offer ketchup as a condiment.[14]

Feb 032013
 

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Chicago-style hot dog, or Chicago Dog, is an all-beef frankfurter[1][3] on a poppy seed bun,[4] originating from the city ofChicago, Illinois. The hot dog is topped with yellow mustard; chopped white onions; bright green sweet pickle relish; a dill picklespear; tomato slices or wedges; pickled sport peppers; and a dash of celery salt.[1][5][6][7] The complete assembly of a Chicago hot dog is said to be “dragged through the garden” due to the many toppings.[8][9] The method for cooking the hot dog itself varies depending on the respective vendors preference. Most often they are steamed, water-simmered or grilled over charcoal, the latter of which are referred to as “char-dogs.”

The canonical recipe[1] does not include ketchup, and there is a widely-shared, strong opinion among many Chicagoans and aficionados that ketchup is unacceptable.[10][11][12][13] A number of Chicago hot dog vendors do not offer ketchup as a condiment.[14]

Jan 032013
 

00slide313An Italian beef is a sandwich of thin slices of seasoned roast beef, dripping with meat juices, on a dense, long Italian-style roll, which originated in Chicago where its history dates back at least to the 1930s.[1] The bread itself is often dipped (or double-dipped) into the juices the meat is cooked in, and the sandwich is typically topped off with Chicago-style giardiniera (called “hot”) or sauteed, green Italian sweet peppers (called “sweet”).

Italian beef sandwiches can be found at most hot dog stands and small Italian-American restaurants throughout the city of Chicago and its suburbs. They are difficult to find outside of Illinois. However, Chicago expatriates have opened restaurants across the country serving Italian beef, Chicago-style hot dogs, and other foods original to the Chicago area.

Italian beef is made using cuts of beef from the sirloin rear or the top/bottom round wet-roasted in broth with garlic, oregano and spices until medium rare or medium. The roast is then cooled, shaved using a deli slicer,[2] and then reintroduced to its reheated beef broth. The beef then sits in the broth, typically for hours. Once a sandwich is ordered, the beef is then drawn from the broth and placed directly on the bread. Because the meat is served dripping wet it is necessary to use a chewy bread, as a softer bread would disintegrate. The typical bread used is long, Italian style loaves without seeds sliced from six to eight inches in length. Italian beef can also be shredded instead of sliced.

Many retailers purchase pre-seasoned, pre-cooked, and pre-sliced Italian beef with separate cooking broth (“au jus”), and then heat and serve, while the most acclaimed Chicago beef places typically prepare the beef on their own premises according to their own recipes. Some produce their own homemade giardiniera as well